E-Catalogues

 

E-catalogue 92: Newly Acquired Literature

E-catalogue 92: Newly Acquired Literature

A recently-purchased collection presented us with the opportunity to re-examine and reassess books we have in stock and put together the following list of literary first editions. It is said that everything old is new again; may this literary excursion yield a previously undiscovered pathway of your own.

E-catalogue 87: Sing the Body Electric

E-catalogue 87: Sing the Body Electric

The bridge between the book and the human body traverses language and feeling. We describe backs as supple, heads and feet as sure or firm, a lip as stained or rough. Is it any wonder that a poetry of words so readily can meet the poetry of the body? Our current e-catalog embraces that intimate and inimitable connection that brings a vocabulary to the shape of ourselves. 

E-catalogue 86: Back to Basics

E-catalogue 86: Back to Basics

What is an alphabet but one of the essential building blocks of language, and thus, of the stories that serve as the backbone of culture? From our first formative educational experience to the intricacies of letterform and design, our mastery of our ABCs shapes how we experience the world during our time in it. We have therefore gathered a selection of material that speaks to this broad range of influence. From 19th century illustrated primers, to Edward Gorey’s Gashleycrumb Tinies; from Vespasiano Amphiareo’s writing manual, to the jewel-like calligraphy in Melissa Sweet’s Garden Companion, we see just how well-traveled these characters are.
E-catalogue 82: Eric Gill and his Circle

E-catalogue 82: Eric Gill and his Circle

The subject of this e-catalogue is the examination of Eric Gill's considerable talents in the book arts. From his work for Count Kessler at the Cranach Press and Robert Gibbings at the Golden Cockerel Press, to the small communities he formed at Ditchling with Hilary Pepler, Gill's prolific output was enduring and his influence on future artists immense. His biographer, Fiona MacCarthy, concludes that he was “a most extraordinary person,” which dovetails perfectly with something Gill himself wrote in 1934: “Art itself has become an extraordinary thing—the activity of peculiar people—people who become more and more peculiar as their activity becomes more and more extraordinary.”