E-Catalogues

 

E-catalogue 39: Holiday Gifts

E-catalogue 39: Holiday Gifts

A book is a very personal object. Scanning a person's shelves, one can learn a lot about a person's tastes, including idiosyncrasies and unusual interests. As a gift, a special book speaks eloquently and intimately to the recipient. We display a small sign in the shop, reading "Rare Books make Fine Gifts, Fine Books make Rare Gifts." Being squarely in the middle of the holiday season, we offer a selection of Fine and Rare Books that might appeal to yourselves or those on your gift list. Please let us know when checking out if your order is a gift that must arrive before a certain date. As always, we thank you for taking the time to peruse our list, and we wish you the happiest of holiday seasons.

E-catalogue 36: Children's Books and Fantasy Illustration

E-catalogue 36: Children's Books and Fantasy Illustration

There are several American chapbooks to begin this 36th e-catalogue of Illustrated Children's and Fantasy Books. The illustrations of Harry Clarke, Walter Crane, Edmund Dulac, and six Arthur Rackham titles are among those representing British printings. European children's books from Spain, Portugal, France, and Germany are listed. An Australian juvenile book in verse rounds out this international offering. In seeking unusual formats, you will find panoramas and shaped books. A Sendak and a Seuss, of course, complete the entrée of children's delights.

E-catalogue 35: New Acquisitions

E-catalogue 35: New Acquisitions

To mark the unofficial start to summer, we are ushering in our favorite season with a select offering of recently acquired books priced under $2,000. This group of over thirty books represents a cross-section of most of our subject specialties, with the exception of children's books, which will be the focus of an upcoming e-catalogue.

E-catalogue 34: Miniature Book New Acquisitions

E-catalogue 34: Miniature Book New Acquisitions

We have recently acquired a small collection of miniature books, which we present here in our latest e-catalogue. Highlights of the collection include: a group of books by David Bryce, including his famous Koran and lectern Bible; several titles by Breed & Butler from the Aunt Fanny and Aunt Laura series; the very rare Calendrier de touts les Saintes from February and April; and a set of presidential miniature books from the Kingsport Press. View the catalogue via the link below, and we hope you enjoy perusing this spring sampling.

E-catalogue 33: Mid-Winter Miniature and Micro-Miniature Books

E-catalogue 33: Mid-Winter Miniature and Micro-Miniature Books

This e-catalogue showcases a selection of recently acquired miniature and micro-miniature books, all published after 1900, including a large group of Borrower's Press books and a set of miniature pop-up views of England distributed as a promotional giveaway by Herbert Tareyton Cigarettes.

E-catalogue 32: Rhyme & Verse

E-catalogue 32: Rhyme & Verse

In describing "the figure a poem makes," Robert Frost noted that "(i)t should be of the pleasure of the poem itself to tell how it can." As we make our way through our reading life, we encounter poetry in many forms, from simple nursery rhymes to the verses we memorized because they spoke to us in some profound way. In our latest e-catalogue, we are highlighting examples of the many ways a poem tells itself. Highlights include: the rare first issue of the Kelmscott Press edition of Alfred Lord Tennyson's Maud; Carol Blinn's visual and verbal homage to David Hockney, Blue Water, Yellow Balls; a group of seven manuscript love poems written by May Sarton and presented as a Christmas gift to her teacher; and a deluxe miniature edition of Emily Dickinson's Poems of Life, with hand-illuminated initials. In poetry, form, format, and language combine to say something with resonance. We hope you find something here that resonates with you.

E-catalogue 31: The World in the Woodgrain

E-catalogue 31: The World in the Woodgrain

The woodcut has been with the western world since the early 15th century, and its rise as a popular form of the visual arts can be at least partially attributed to the ease with which woodcuts could be printed side-by-side with text composed from movable type. As a result, the woodcut, and its kissing cousin, the wood engraving, were the only media for illustrating printed books until the late-sixteenth century, after which point techniques developed for engraving on other surfaces--stone, copper, then steel--offering alternatives that displaced the humble woodcut. Yet, the process of transferring images to paper via a carved block of wood managed to bounce back, enjoying revivals as recently as the mid-twentieth century. Its resilience is perhaps the result of a level of expression that can be teased out of a woodblock's positive and negative spaces. It is an attempt to illustrate this wide range that lies behind our latest e-catalogue.