Item #31917 The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
(Fine Binding)

The Woodman and the Nightingale. And To Night, by Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Sangorski, Alberto (illus.)

London: 1916. Octavo. 10ff., + 2ff.. Signed by Alberto Sangorski at the colophon. Sangorski's unique vellum manuscript suitably echoes the romantic aesthetic championed by Shelley's poetry. Each of the four miniatures emphasizes the influence of nature, either by literally or figuratively minimizing the stature of the human figure (as in the full-page frontispiece depiction of the titular woodman and the sleeping woman at the title page for "To Night"), co-opting it into allegory (as in the full-page characterization of night itself as a woman), or eschewing humanity entirely (as in the miniature at the foot of page 13, which shows an expansive evening landscape in which a lone turret stands as solitary evidence of civilization). Added to the sense of the manuscript as honorific to the aims of the Romantic poets are the resplendent title page with lettering in red and gold and full floral border, and further florals adorning every subsequent page. Every stanza bears an illuminated initial, many of which are large and multi-colored. A tight work from Sangorski, unyielding in its exhibition of his talent.

In a relievo binding executed by Rivière & Son, a terrific example of that uncommon style. Relievo binding requires a powerful fly-press, with which the binder can emboss the leather (or, in this case, leathers of many colors). Full brown morocco over boards, with both covers bearing symmetrical designs of inlaid black morocco border within which is a frame of gilt-tooled acorns, vines, and oak leaves, all of which are detailed by green and black inlays. On the upper cover, a recessed central arabesque panel depicts in molded and painted leather a pastoral scene of a grove giving way to a mill, haystacks, river, and church. On the lower cover, an identical recessed panel displays a path entering a thick wood. Spine in six compartments with gilt titling to two and black-bordered gilt panels to remaining four. Gilt rules to edges, a continuation of the acorn and oak leaf design at turn-ins, green silk doublures. Very fine. Housed in a silk-lined box, the upper cover of which is detached. A.e.g. Bookplate of Jerome Kern laid in. Item #31917

(Boyle 305, Kern 1101, Lahey 64).

Price: $65,000.00

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