E-Catalogues

 

E-catalogue 29: A Library for Your Walls

E-catalogue 29: A Library for Your Walls

As bibliophiles, we know too well the appeal of a particularly strong, or sensual image found in a print or piece of original art. These pieces allow us to create a personal museum inspired by the pages of our books, which points to a very subtle relationship between the illustrated book and works on paper. For this e-catalogue, we have pulled together a diverse group of works on paper -- original art, prints, and broadsides -- that we think speak to this relationship. A significant portion of the artists represented in this selection are well-known to collectors of illustrated books: Sarah Chamberlain, Edward Gorey, Rockwell Kent, and Barry Moser, among many others. A few of the works produced by these artists were published, but most were created to stand on their own as prints, broadsides, or works of original art. We hope this offering inspires you to consider a few new volumes for the library on your walls.

E-catalogue 27: Artists' Books

E-catalogue 27: Artists' Books

For our twenty-seventh e-catalogue, we have pulled together over thirty artists' books that we feel strike a balance between text, illustration, and the design and execution of the book itself. The examples range from the Eragny Press masterpiece, La Charrue d'Érable, to John and Joy Tonkin's miniature book, ABC New Zealand Style, which contains an alphabet of New Zealand's particular dialect. From the field of children's books are examples of work from Belgian Fauvist Edgard Tijtgat and Italian Futurist Bruno Munari, and in the archive for Still, Mali Burgess's tour-de-force of concrete poetry, we see the printed word itself as the illustration, in the tradition of the Calligrammes of Apollinaire. We hope that you enjoy this exploration of the creativity, versatility, and ingenuity of artists' books.

E-catalogue 25: A Selection of Children's Books

E-catalogue 25: A Selection of Children's Books

In the process of choosing a specialty area for our first e-catalogue of the summer season, our thoughts turned to childhood. It can be argued that summer is best enjoyed when one is young, and many of our best memories spring from experiences as children in summertime. We have therefore gathered together a group of fifty-odd children's books and related material for your consideration.

E-catalogue 24: By the Waters

E-catalogue 24: By the Waters

Whether it's fly-fishing at the lake, or sailing on the open ocean, water figures very largely in our summer activities; that it makes up most of the earth's surface and the human body means that it is a central element in our lives. It is only natural, then, that water should also be a major symbol in literature, and we can see this from the Old Testament to Moby Dick. For our latest e-catalogue, we have therefore pulled together a surprisingly diverse group of books in which water plays a thematic role.

E-catalogue 23: The Ides of March

E-catalogue 23: The Ides of March

If it weren't for Roman history and Shakespeare, there would be nothing ominous about the Ides of March. Its etymology is innocuous enough: it simply means the middle of March. However, the events of this day in 44 B.C. forever changed the language used in association with it. We would like to mark the middle of March by highlighting Classical literature, or works that have been inspired by Latin and Greek writers. This includes fine press printers who have been enticed by the challenge of designing Classical texts, from Giambattista Bodoni, whose vast oeuvre includes a handsome edition of Anacreon in Greek, to the Officina Bodoni, which often produced original texts and their translations in the same work. Many book illustrators have also found inspiration in Classical texts, including the French Catalan sculptor Aristide Maillol, who embraced a simpler line in his Odes of Horace, and Georges Barbier and Jean-Francois Schmied, whose Les Chansons de Bilitis is widely considered an Art-Deco highspot. As with Caesar's walk to the Theater of Pompey, books also have their destiny as Terentianus reminds us: Habent sua fata libell.

E-catalogue 22: Asian Influence

E-catalogue 22: Asian Influence

The recent celebration of the Chinese New Year gives one a yearly occasion to reflect upon the traditions and influences of East-Asian cultures that reach across the globe. As we examine the artistic output of East Asia, one can certainly behold a worldview that is quite different from that which is familiar to European and American sensibilities. And yet, the mirror that reflects a culture can also be a piece of glass that shows its face to the world, and it is this duality that is the theme behind our latest e-catalogue. The books selected for this catalogue range from 19th-century Chinese watercolors depicting the harvesting of tea and an album of paintings by Japanese artist Takeuchi Seiho, to works by artists in the West, who were influenced by East-Asian aesthetics and philosophy, such as Edmund Dulac, Morris Cox, and Mali Burgess. When gathering material together for this catalogue, we were surprised at the breadth of subjects that fit our theme. We hope you will find a few surprises here as well.